Celebrating National Ag Day

Breakfast, lunch, or dinner, every meal should remind us of the importance of agriculture in our daily lives.  From the food in our refrigerators to the fibers in our clothes, we can attribute it all to the work accomplished on farms and ranches around the U.S. On Tuesday we celebrated National Ag Day. A day to honor the producers in our communities and around the U.S. for the tireless, diligent work they do to provide for all.  The average U.S. farmer feeds 155
people. In 1960, a farmer fed just 26 people (americasfarmers.com). The significance of the work accomplished by each producer has never been more important.

The U.S. agricultural sector continues to be a shining example of economic stability and growth according to the USDA.
While the economic landscape changes, agriculture has been our one stable constant. To commemorate Ag Day and to expand our knowledge of the vast variety of U.S. agricultural products, we held a lunch in our office with foods from each geographical U.S. region.  Associates were divided into groups and given a list of produce grown specifically in their region and were asked to bring in one dish to feed our office.

From the West region: chicken salad with grapes and almonds served on wheat crackers.

From the Southwest region: hot corn dip with tortilla chips and pecan-corn muffins with jalapeno jelly.

From the Southeast region: sweet potato and sausage skewers with lemon-garlic mayonnaise.

From the Northeast region: cranberry pecan cheese ball drizzled in maple syrup.

From the Midwest region: cranberry-sauced meatballs and wild rice sticks.

Following the meal, we divided back into our regional groups for a brain-busting game of agricultural 20 questions with the prize of a home-grown, South Dakota based gift basket going to the winning team.  With a three way tie after 20 multiple choice questions, the game came down to a sudden death true-or-false round which left only team Southeast standing.


Find the answer to this question at the end of the blog post!


Did you know that the plant that bananas grow on is not actually a tree but an herb? Team Southeast did.

Agriculture has been and always will be an intricate and vital part of the American economy. Benjamin Franklin once stated that the only honest way for a nation to acquire wealth is through agriculture “wherein man receives a real increase of the seed thrown into the ground, in a kind of continual miracle, wrought by the hand of God in his favor, as a reward for his innocent life and his virtuous industry.”  This is a great reminder for us all to appreciate agriculture not only on National Ag Day, but every day.

Answer: A. 2%