Memorial Day Photo Essay: Through A Lens of Reflection

Every time I see a flag fluttering in the breeze, my heart skips a beat.

I’ve had the privilege of traveling through a majority of the United States because of the men and women in uniform, both past and present. And throughout that journey, I’ve lost count of the moments that left me in awe of this great country.

Planning a future with a soldier gives me an even deeper appreciation for the soldiers and their families that have already walked the road ahead of me. Every single day, there are so many little—and monumental—sacrifices made in their lives. Even when they’re not deployed. Even when it’s not Guard Drill weekend. And especially when some had nothing left to give.

As we pay tribute to them this Memorial Day, take a moment to reflect on the many men and women who came before us and died for our freedoms.

A patriotic, fire-lit ceremony in Providence, R.I.

A flag stands watch at a Colorado fire lookout tower.

Mount Rushmore might be one of the most identifiable monuments in the United States.

The Korean War Veterans Memorial contains statues of men prowling the jungle with fear in their eyes, unsure of what lies ahead.

A rising moon outside of a building very near the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia, Pa.

The only photo with no red, white and blue, but perhaps one of the most moving—even today, oil drops regularly surface at the site of the USS Arizona Memorial at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Roses line the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C.

One of my favorite features the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C. is the ring of flags surrounding it.

A soldier marches the well-worn path at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery, Va.

The decisions made within the walls of this house feel heavy when you stand within them—The White House, Washington, D.C.

A serene night portrait of the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C.